Posted by: Sam Olsen | August 2, 2011

Ike: just gone for tit

If any of you have been to Beijing’s Silk Market – or indeed, have been offered “genuine DVDs” by an anorak wearing Chinese bloke carrying a fat CD case and a shifty gaze – then you will perhaps understand that this part of the world has a preponderance for the non-authentic. But it was a bit of a surprise to find a whole range of what could be, um, less than straight goods for sale in one of the best known departments stores. Called Sincere, one review called it “Hong Kong’s most eclectic department store stocks everything from frying pans to jelly beans”, and it was “the first store in Hong Kong to give paid days off to employees, the first to hire women in sales positions, and the first to establish a fixed-price policy backed up by the regionally novel idea of issuing receipts”. They obviously took both of these firsts to heart because there were a sum total of zero men working there (that were allowed to be on show, at least) and I received about twenty individual receipts for the pair of shorts I bought.

But what really stood out was the range of ‘Ike’ sportswear that was on sale, complete with recognisable swish logo. Sadly there was no “Weebok” or “Daddydas”. It all looked absolutely convincing, and who knows – there could be a legitimate Chinese brand called Ike which has no web presence, no marketing strategy or any presence other than car boots and street vendors; or well-known department stores. Or alternatively it could be a botched job by really non-English speaking workers. I thought I had stumbled across another humdinger when I discovered “Leaveland” clothing with a logo (below) rather reminiscent of Timberland, but some web searches illuminated me to their prominence (Philippines, and apparently above-board). Good riff on the name though.

 For China watchers none of this will come as a surprise. In Kunming City (Yunnan Province, S China) recently some Apple stores were exposed as such good fakes that the workers even believed they were working for the Californian Giant rather than a wily Chinese outfit, as some of you will have read. The difference here though is that fakes are on sale in the heart of local HK retail respectability. 

Fake or Real?

 

 

 

Real or Fake?

 

 

 

 

Have any of you any good fake names to recommend? Any “Puna” sports clothes to be seen, or “Dulce & Gabbanos” perhaps?

 

 

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Responses

  1. Sammy,

    Can you buy me a pair of Conversace
    Ball Star Classics

    If I get peckerish I wouldn’t mind some S&Ms too.

    Ricky

    • Ha ha good one. Chocolate S&M could be interesting…talk soon


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